60-second slices of present // Warsaw 2012

2012 was a fruitful year as to continuing my photo project “60-second slices of present”. In my last post on the selection of 60-second shots from Berlin I mentioned that I plan to extend this work with photos from other cities around the world, too. So here’s a start at that: last year in October I spend a couple of days in Warsaw and these are the fruits of that trip:

To me it seemed present Warsaw has a fast pulse. The images reflect on this city’s young past, its uprising economic power and its vast infrastructural spaces with lots of buzz and motion in them.

I remember having very much enjoyed the city’s vibe. Besides using 25 ASA black and white negative material I also tested out Fuji Velvia 50 for my purpose to see how one Warsaw minute would look like in color.

I like the colour shots, too. There is a certain subtlety to them the monochrome ones don’t seem to have. But still, for the future, I decided to keep the project in black and white just to keep it consistent.

Here’s a shot from behind the scenes. It was taken while I was exposing the first shot of the twelve shown above. I think it questions how limited our concept of time is and what happens if, for a shot, the timespan is extended out of the conventional frame of human perception.

60sec-slices-Warsaw-2012-2012091014

60-second slices of present // Berlin 2012

Now that 2013 has just started, I’d like to present a selection of last year’s “60-second slices of present”. This sparse, yet compact selection of works is part of the eponymous ongoing series that I started almost three years ago. It has become a pleasure to reflect on the project’s development since.

What, out of sheer curiosity, started as a rather simple experiment to depict man-made, yet manless space has now become more than just some sophisticalaborate longtime exposure photo trickery. I’d like to consider it has become a kind of research about how we as human beings perceive time.

It seems that above our spatial scale we also possess a temporal one. And more a side product it was, that with a haphazardly chosen timespan of 60 seconds I found out about the beautiful sculpturality of frozen collective human motion.

And in the end, to be honest – taking daylight longtime exposures has grown to be an obsession. Having a delicate glimpse into the future besprinkled with a pinch of well-guarded lunacy I not only want to examine Berlin’s urban space, but other cities, too. I want to find out about the scale of other cities and I want to elaborate a way to capture their pulse.

As 21st century’s citizens are going to be mostly urban inhabitants and the phenomenon of highly populated and high-density agglomerations is predicted to extend around the globe it will even more be interesting to establish an archive of 60-second material that will allow comparisons.

New 60-second slices of present

Some time ago I introduced my idea to a conceptual series I named 60-second slices of present. What had started as an experiment about two years ago has ever since been becoming a long-term photo project. Here comes a selection of last year’s results.